Information That Place of Historical Interest You Went To...

Discussion in 'Recreation & Travel' started by Doctor Omega, Feb 28, 2017.

  1. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    4,127
    Likes Received:
    995
    So you went to a site on the world map where something historically important - whether great or small - happened once...

    How did it make you feel?

    Share it on here...

    [​IMG]

     
    #1 Doctor Omega, Feb 28, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2017
  2. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 6

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    1,794
    Likes Received:
    890
    I haven't been to too many historical sites, only because I can't afford to travel. One of the places I have gone was Fort Snelling in Minnesota. It had been a holding site for hundreds of Native Americans during the 19th century as they were being forced onto reservations. I remember seeing pictures of the time, where the land outside the fort was covered in tipis while the natives waited their next move. Seeing the place in real life was a little melancholy. One of those things I think of being of both European and Native American ancestry.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Hux

    Hux Member: Rank 6

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2017
    Messages:
    1,263
    Likes Received:
    624
    I used to live down the road from Haworth and I'm ashamed to say it wasn't until I was in my thirties that I went there (and that was only because an ex wanted to go). Done most of the London touristy stuff. Likewise Dublin, Rome, Venice, Paris, Athens and Amsterdam.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  4. Carol

    Carol Member: Rank 5

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2017
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    611
    @Hux
    With you on the Haworth anomaly - I didn't get there (about 20 miles) until an American friend asked me to guide her and about 20 of her students. Could have been a bit embarassing, but thanks to good signposts and deep-seated Blue Peter memories I faked it quite nicely. Shame about the student who very politely, half way across the moors to Top Withens told me discreetly she needed a "rest room". Still, a dry stone wall in a stiff breeze gets the job done somehow or other.

    Oh yes - I also worked at the Tower of London for 3 years - never got old (except all the old stuff).
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Love it! Love it! x 1
  5. mustang2006

    mustang2006 Member: Rank 2

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2017
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    48
    Went to Dealy Plaza in Texas where JFK was shot. Felt quite creepy.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Carol

    Carol Member: Rank 5

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2017
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    611
    Not surprised! Presumably (unlike the Tower) not at all touristy, but simply still there?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    4,127
    Likes Received:
    995

    I have always assumed that there is some kind of preservation order which stops them ever changing the look of that place from that fateful day, for reasons of historical interest? But is that indeed the case? I have noticed in video footage that there are white X's taped on the road indicating the position of the car when each of the shots struck.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Carol

    Carol Member: Rank 5

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2017
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    611
    Hi Doc,
    Just for once I wish there were an alternative to click on, something on the lines of "hmm, interesting" - just "like" seems wrong for this under the circumstances. I suppose that in England the places where many kings were murdered, killed in battle or otherwise disappeared in dubious circumstances are now ruined castles or still undeveloped forests or worked fields... X's marking the spot wouldn't really work.
    I'm not a huge fan of true crime documentaries, but have seen a few - there's usually some sort of punchline to the effect of "and the murder house has now been demolished and/ or now that street has been renamed..." so for "ordinary" victims it seems that society needs obliteration rather than the commemoration of the violent deaths of famous bodies. I wonder who decides?
    One time, not that long ago, I was in the church of St Denis on the edge of Paris - someone had recently left a fresh red rose on the tomb of Marie Antoinette - another hmm?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    4,127
    Likes Received:
    995
    Yes, the Dakota building entrance-way in New York is another one that is visited solely by people who want to look at the spot where Lennon fell. Chillingly, his killer was fully aware of the historical importance of the site, saying something along the lines of "Go there, look at it. And think: that's where it happened..." I guess the importance of the site helped make him, the murdering non-entity feel important too. He had made his mark in an enduring way, in a place that would serve as a long lasting reminder of his deed. He wasn't a nobody anymore.

    Whether he considered that before he fired the bullets, I am not sure, but he quickly became aware of it after.

    Having said all that, I would love to go to both Dealey Plaza and the Dakota and "feel" the history soaked into both those places. It is just a shame that, in Chapman's case, he understood history enough to know how it worked in his warped favour.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Carol

    Carol Member: Rank 5

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2017
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    611
    I'm the generation who knew exactly where we were when we heard John Lennon was dead - but I'd still rather go the the Cavern next time I'm west of the Pennines - to celebrate his life and give Chapman f*** all attention, beacuse that's why he pulled the trigger.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. mustang2006

    mustang2006 Member: Rank 2

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2017
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    48
    Well it wasn't very busy around there, no. But I didn't go up to the museum in the building. Probably were more people there.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  12. mustang2006

    mustang2006 Member: Rank 2

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2017
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    48
    It isn't exactly like it was, as far as I could determine. The freeway sign and some of the trees have been removed.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Carol

    Carol Member: Rank 5

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2017
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    611
    Apologies for my ignorance - never been to Dallas - of course there must be a museum, but it had never occurred to me that it was right there. It's such as huge moment in recent American history, that being aware of the President's actual memorial (which is Arlington, right?) and cashing in on visitors being curious might seem a bit morbid ... probably very wrong for a Brit to guess at this without visiting, too.

    Full disclosure of sorts- first holiday in the US, a friend showing us round the "Liberty Trail" around Boston - she said - look over there - historical monument.
    We said, where? Near that church?
    She said - it IS that church.
    We thought, (but politely did not say out loud: it's eighteenth century. Shit! Hereabouts that's historical.)
    We SAID, Mmm, historical.

    But there's also an excellently tasteful Kennedy memorial at Runneymede on the Thames, which I have seen.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 6

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    1,794
    Likes Received:
    890
    One thing I've always wanted to do if I get to visit England is do the Whitechappel walk (Don't Judge Me!!!). I think it would be fascinating, but also kind of a let down, since I've watched video on it, and none of those locations look anything like they did. Everything has been updated, so it would be like "Yeah, Jack the Ripper killed these women here, but not really, because it's a Starbuck's now".

    Also, I know there isn't a Starbuck's in any of those locations, but you get the analogy.

    Quit judging me!
     
    • Like Like x 2
  15. Doctor Omega

    Doctor Omega Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    4,127
    Likes Received:
    995

    I love it! So true. :emoji_alien:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. chainsaw_metal1

    chainsaw_metal1 Member: Rank 6

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    1,794
    Likes Received:
    890
    Tour Guide: And on this spot, Annie Chapman mas brutally murdered. Her gushing blood covered the pavement.
    Barista: Do you want whipped cream on your low fat white chocolate/caramel macchiato?
    Tour Guide: Of course I want whipped cream! And please hold all questions until after the tour!
    Barista [under his breath]: I'd better be getting a big tip outta this ass hat.
    Tour Guide: What?
    Barista: Do you want a muffin?
     
    • Like Like x 2
  17. Carol

    Carol Member: Rank 5

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2017
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    611
    I took a couple of groups of American students on Ripper walks in a previous life - the very best was with a talented local historian who quickly pointed out hat nothing could match up to everyone's expectations based on horror films. So we walked the walk with lots of alternative stories about the East End, especially things he'd learned from Jewish grandparents who'd settled there. It's still possible to get a bagel from the 24 hour bakery at the top of Brick Lane, but that community has mostly moved on and up - mostly it's curry restaurants now. Then it's a quick left and another body drop site - still after dark, in winter it's quite atmospheric. Throw in medieval monks, plagues, riots and assorted other grisly crimes, it's well worth it.

    My favourite spooky walk, though, is Edinburgh Old Town. Honourable mention too to the campfire tales of monsters told by rangers at the Grand Canyon.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  18. mustang2006

    mustang2006 Member: Rank 2

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2017
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    48
    CAROL: "Apologies for my ignorance..."
    That is certainly not necessary.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  19. Nick91

    Nick91 Member: Rank 2

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2017
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    42
    Not technically a historical event, but in the area where I grew up, there were a certain type of large carved stones dating back to the mid-1000s. These weren't guarded in any museum or anything; they were located in either the forest or on a grass field. Every day, we used to play soccer with these stones as one of the goal posts, it was quite fun.

    The cool thing is that there were these plaques besides them where the inscriptions were interpreted and translated into modern language. What people from that particular regional civilisation had to say a thousand years ago can basically be communicated directly to us.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
    #19 Nick91, Mar 25, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2017
  20. Carol

    Carol Member: Rank 5

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2017
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    611
    Hi Nick - it's been a month or so but you still haven't told us where this is! Please tell more - it's fascinating. Or - if you don't - very frustrating!
     

Share This Page