Review Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973)

Discussion in 'Film: 1971 - 1980' started by Tuco, Mar 15, 2017.

  1. Tuco

    Tuco Member: Rank 1

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2017
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    40
    I was listening to Dylan's Knockin' on Heaven's Door this morning. It prompted me to go to Youtube to watch this scene, which I think is one of the great "dying" scenes in cinema. Itis one of Pickens's great dramatic scenes, and Katy Jurado is magnificent. As usual, I had tears streaming down my face . . . yeah, I'm a softy.

     
  2. Carol

    Carol Member: Rank 5

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2017
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    611
    That song could destroy anyone without the backing of a deeply moving film clip to back it up! You're just in touch with your inner cowboy, man.
    Yours, Inner Cowgirl (oh god - don't google that... I think it makes sense the way I meant it)
     
  3. Tuco

    Tuco Member: Rank 1

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2017
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    40
    ROFLOL !!!
     
  4. Carol

    Carol Member: Rank 5

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2017
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    611
    Damn!
    Never got one of those before - thank you, kind sir (I think).
    Anyway - I believe we were discussing Westerns...... (damn, I never know to quit when I'm behind) (oh god, don't.....)

    Will I drag every Western thread into Blazing Saddles territory?
     
  5. mustang2006

    mustang2006 Member: Rank 2

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2017
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    48
    Yep, Peckinpah violence and then Dylan song. Moving stuff.
     
  6. Elliot Thomas

    Elliot Thomas Member: Rank 3

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    87
    A very meditative, pensive western, an initial failure after studio truncation but then restored to its original form by director Peckinpah (subsequently released in 1988, four years after his death). Coburn was never better as gunman turned sheriff Pat Garrett who goes head-to-head with former friend, partner and outlaw Billy the Kid (Kristofferson). This elegy to the Old West, a time of myth and legend, has a mournful and sombre tone due to the impending decay of that wild way of life as modern advancement begins to take effect. The brooding performances, featuring a veteran cast (of the western genre) add to the effect in this complex, rich and incisive film that’s worthy of multiple viewings. Dylan, who plays Alias, supplies a collection of atmospheric songs.
     
    • Like Like x 1

Share This Page